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union and the nato or meant to keep russia out and the germans down now they are triumphant economically. germany may not have the solution to every economic problem but to berlin is the point of arbitration for all of them so the question arises and this goes back to the geography with russia needing the buffer zone in eastern europe remember the collapse didn't indian security facing ray it faced invasions' with will lead vehicle lithuanians, french, german throughout history. so we're back with a regional power flashed with natural gas. a rich and wealthy germany, poland between them that has -- >> it has gas under that many get an energy power in the century. this is living in geography. your argument about russia and russia's in security would be that it's too flat. half the world's longitudes but it's indefensible, it runs north, south so they don't unite the country and had less people than bangladesh. 141 million people, bangladesh has more. so vladimir putin sent up near imperialism on the deepak geographical and security and that's how we should understand not as a madman hour
. senators continued debate today on normalizing trade relations with russia. a vote expected shortly after noon today. and not to live coverage of the u.s. senate here on c-span2. the chaplain, dr. barry black, will lead the senate in prayer. the chaplain: let us pray. god of wonder, beyond all majesty, you alone are worthy of our praise. stay with us, bringing your grace and gladness to brighten our lives. lord, remove our sins from us and cleanse us with your spirit, emancipating us from fears about what tomorrow may hold. continue to direct the steps of our lawmakers, keeping them from eleventh-hour decisions that bring unintended negative consequences. remind them that the cost of indecision may be much higher than they anticipate. purple them of the things that increase discord, that in unity they may serve you with fanalfulness. we pray in your sacred name. amen. the presiding officer: please join me in reciting the pledge of allegiance to the flag. i pledge allegiance to the flag of the united states of america and to the republic for which it stands, one nation under god, indivisib
and the new congress will have to start all over again. >> eric: all right. thanks. >> coming up, russia has banned adoptions by u.s. families. coming up, we will speak with a couple in the process of adopting this little boy, about their ordeal and how right now, they can't bring him home and give him the life that they say he deserves. >> eric: we will give smuadvice about how young people can start now for planning for their retirement. that's right, without breaking the bank. advice on building, not breaking your nest egg, as you get older. >> we are just 48 hours away from new year's eve. why is all that confetti falling now? we will have an answer, coming up. sometimes what we suffer from is bigger than we think ... like the flu. with aches, fever and chills- the flu's a really big deal. so why treat it like it's a little cold? there's something that works differently than over-the-counter remedies. prescription tamiflu attacks the flu virus at its source. so don't wait. call your doctor right away. tamiflu is prescription medicine for treating the flu in adults and children one year a
as pntr, with russia and moldova and to update russian human rights legislation. we have to take many difficult votes in this chamber, but this is not one of them. in fact, this is a rare opportunity to pass a good bill that we all can agree on. pntr is good for united states jobs. russia is a fast-growing market. when russia joined the w.t.o. in august, it opened its markets to the other 155 members of the w.t.o. who have pntr with russia. pntr will give u.s. farmers, ranchers, businesses and workers new opportunities in russia and new jobs here at home. our competitors in china and canada and europe are not taking advantage of these opportunities because they have pntr with russia, they already have it. we are the only w.t.o. member missing out on these opportunities. if we now pass pntr, we can level the playing field and compete, and if we compete we will win. we sell more beef, we sell more aircraft, we will sell more trademarks, we will sell more medical equipment and our banks and insurance companies will grow. pntr will give our knowledge industries greater protections for the
in russia. also we're learning more about the suspect accused of pushing a man in front of a new york subway. her surprising confession. >>> and new photos from mars. >>> that's new dash cam video tonight of a deadly plane crash in moscow. this was posted on youtube and shows the moment a red wings airline plane overshoots the runway at russia's third largest airport and comes to rest near the highway. there were no passengers on the plane and apparently no one on the ground was hurt but at least four members of the eight person crew died. investigators still trying to figure out why the plane veered off the runway. we're getting our first look at the woman accused of pushing a man in front of a subway train in queens. police have charged 31-year-old erica menendez with murder as a hate crime. she was arrested this morning after someone recognized her from this surveillance video. menendez is accused of shoving 46-year-old sodano sen onto the tracks as the train approached on thursday. police she she admitted to doing it because she said she hated hindus and muslims since the 9/11 terrorist
, family dreams frozen. >> thanks to a chilly relationship between the u.s. and russia, the future of a lot of children is hanging in the balance. so details on that, straight ahead. >>> "world news ♪ ♪ >>> welcome back, everyone. and welcome is what dozens of american families may not get the chance to do when it comes to children they're hoping to adopt from russia. >> russian president vladamir putin will sign a bill blocking americans from adopting russian children. >> reporter: when russia bans adoptions to the united states, this is who gets caught in the middle. an american mother and a 5 1/2-year-old orphan with spina bifida named paulina. a little girl who is already learning to count in english and tells her mommy she loves her. >> i love you, too. >> reporter: kendra skaggs and her husband last saw paulina a few days ago on a visit to her orphanage in moscow. now, with the love only a mother can feel, she worries what will happen to her daughter. >> i can't help her. i can't tell her i love her. so it's really hard. >> reporter: americans have adopted over 60,000 russian chil
here? >> reporter: yes, gregg. russia is furious about a u.s. law which puts visa bans and asset freezes on 60 russians that congress believes were involved in some way or complicit in the deaths of a russian lawyer in jail in 2009. now he was investigating a massive fraud case at the request of a u.s. company in russia that believed millions of dollars it paid to the russian government in tax money were diverted, stolen by russians with connections to the government. he was 30 self -- 37 years old when he died and the allegations are that at best he was denied medical treatment while in jail. at worse he was tortured. russia has been very defiant in this case and trying him posthumously for fraud. the russian government passed this ban, what appears to be retaliatory law prohibiting americans from adopting russian orphans, naming the law after a 2-year-old boy who died while in the custody of u.s. adopted parents a few years ago. gregg? gregg: amy, are there repercussions here? >> reporter: there certainly are. even though this law was passed pretty much unanimously in russia's
francisco today. we bought naval forces from the united states, from russia and japan all to honolulu where we had simulated a tsunami disaster. and these three great nations brought their fleets to honolulu exercising how to respond and alleviate that disaster. well, that was then. how about now? last year the united states released a new security strategy. most of you probably have not even heard of that, but i have to tell you this was a big deal. it was one of the fifth american security strategies that we have issued since the civil war. among the highlights of that security strategy was a strong statement that the united states had the highest economic and security interests in the asia pacific region. not in europe as has been for 100 years prior to that, than the asia pacific region. secondly, that we would maintain freedom of access throughout that region. in particular, we would maintain the sea lanes in that area, whatever the challenge might be. even as we reduce our defense budget, therefore we must maintain and would maintain a powerful navy, and that that navy would be charge
's for families trying to adopt children in russia. president vladimir putin has signed a new law banning adoptions by americans. russia is retaliate against the u.s. law that imposes sanctions on russians who are found to be human rights violators. about 50 u.s. families were in the process of adopting children. the head of a bay area agency says it is not deal with any local clients at the moment. >> same-sex marriage in the state of maine became legal to that. the city of portland began issuing first licenses to eager couples or just after midnight. other cities are holding special hours drop the day today. this november, maine, washington and maryland became the first is to approve a marriage by popular vote. same-sex marriages are already taking place in washington state. maryland will begin issuing marriage licenses on tuesday. >> we will be right back. >> welcome back. here is a live look outside on our van ness will scan. >> we're taking a look is storm tracker 4. we are still in dealing with sprinkles outside. it really is not too much. the rain is tapering off and this is a view
? >> the group was more optimistic than many people in looking at the world. they see russia as a country that doesn't pose any threats now and really won't, can't for many years. they see china as a potential threat in the future but recognize we have common interests in china which would ease that threat. and they see the great instability in the middle east as posing specific threats to us such as the chemical weapons in syria which could fall in the hands of terrorists, but see these threats as threats to be managed, not to be resolved once and for all. meaning we can protect the chemical weapons. we don't have to go in and turn syria into a democracy. >> you want the united states to build one of the points that the report makes early on, to build on comparative strengths and address comparative weaknesses. from your standpoint what are those strengths that need to be built on, and then what are the weaknesses that need to be addressed? >> well, our military forces have unprecedented capabilities. we've spent a lot over the last 10 years, as you know, and it shows in our naval power,
in the hundreds aside from the u.s. and russia. and they would have to be included which is a complication. >> i want to take you to the question of strategy and strategy formulation. there are those who say that the united states has lost its ability to think and to act strategically if you look at for example our involvement in iraq, there are those who say that was strategically unwise and became something that was negative to the united states' broad interests. if you look at where we are now closing in on a fiscal cliff or fiscal crises of our own making that could then become obviously problematic for america's borrowing capabilities and economic health more broadly. have we combated strategic thinking. if so why and what do we have to do to become better at strategic thinking. >> attention to the inbox is killing us because it takes away our opportunity to think in long-term -- and to do long- term thinking. and to think strategically. there's no part of the government that really does strategic thinking well now. i mean the state department has a policy planning organization. they don't
there might be a point now where we can start cooperating with russia on an eventual syria outcome, a syria without assad. in my view we need to look for a place to cooperate with russia. there are lot ss of areas where our interests intersect. this may be one of them. >> thank you very much, general myers. >>> political crisis in egypt is growing, planning a general strike and massive rally outside the presidential palace. several egyptian newspapers didn't print today. private tv networks plan to shut down tomorrow. holly williams is watching it all from cairo. >> reporter: president morsi's opponents say today's protest is a final warning to the president and his islamist allies. they're expecting tens of thousands of people, perhaps more. and some of them will march on to the presidential palace. this follows days of political turmoil here in egypt, including protests, violent clashes. protesters are angry about two things. firstly, president morsi's power grab of 12 days ago in which he gave himself sweeping new authority, including immunity from the court. secondly
clinton met with russia's foreign minister twice today in dublin. these are important meetings because russia is a syrian alley. but is it too late? national security contributor, fran townsend, is a member of the cia. cedrick layton member of the joipt staff. what are those consequences? is the u.s. going to passing the point of no return here? >> well, it is, look, the most recent information suggests they're preparing to be able to launch these warheads containing gas and other chemical weapons. that's a problem because now, a military strike could trigger the dissemination of such weapons. what you have to do now is is get the timely tactical intelligence to interrupt the decision cycle. that is get between assad and the individual who presses the button to launch that missile. that's a very ask, very difficult, but now, that's the position we're really in. >> just to be honest, hasn't really seemed to be at least totally aware of everything happening every step of the way here. >> okay, except there was a wmd commission that looked at the failures in iraq and strengthened the comm
the new chain. burger king has similar joint ventures in russia, brazil, south africa and china. >> more than 14,000 dock workers on the east coast and the gulf are threatening to go on strike on sunday. brian takes a look at the impact it could have on the economy. >> they move everything from our clothes to toys and electronics through the ports and into the marketplace but a lot of the goods won't be making it to our stores in longshoreman at more than a dozen ports from main to texas go on strike. that's what could happen by sunday if a deal can't be reached between the major shipping companies and a union representing nearly 15,000 longshoremen. >> the impact would be great. obviously on the dollar value side. on the cargo handling side but also on the job side because again these sports are major economic generators. >> richard of the maryland port administrator and others say the economic damage from a strike would reach well beyond the docks. >> your mom and pop retailer to your farmer to the trucking company that has to pick up the container atmosphere the port. so not just at t
the soviet union. i asked my teenage daughter, she says you know, what's wrong with russia? russia was the soviet union and she said what's that? it's a big thing in the late 80s and early '90s before it toppled. we were geared up to fight them and most of us have never really considered iraq or knew who saddam hussein was. after that war was over, which winning was a forgone conclusion, you you no? the terrorism thing caught us by surprise. we thought they were rabble-rousers and never gave them too much credit. interesting enough all the buildings in khobar were told by the bin laden construction company and they had the bin laden stamps on all of the buildings. how is that for irony? but after that things kind of changed and the world trade center bombings and september 11 of course, we all know what happened that day. i was actually flying that morning and had come back from the middle east from another
or three books and notepad and if for instance it is the week before the invasion of russia, mid june of 1941, i've got all the diaries piled up next to one chair, another of all the recollections, speeches churchill may have made, telegrams to roosevelt, warnings to stalin. and i approached it and i told bill phillips this -- host: your editor? guest: yes, my editor bill tphreupls. as if i was making a quilt. and i think this got a little off in the "new york times" artic article, that i would focus on that story that week, the invasion of russia. well, there was always something else happening that week, too. now we've two or three stories that have to be intertwined and i can't go down too far in the road to august of 1941 with the russian front and ca come all the way back to june 20 then go down to august with the african front. it wouldn't work. so, a read a lot. i bought harriman's memoirs. bill man westchester, in his notes, would xerox a page and cut out a little paragraph and 50 pages later you may find another paragraph from harriman's family worries but there was no contex
, and it -- russia. 70% of the world's energy is here. and energy becomes so dramatically contagious, what do you do, briefly on human rights, i do believe actually the big difference between the democracy and dictatorship is simply this, a soft asset but very important one that india doesn't record human-rights that we will necessarily be proud of but -- i believe that china may be a successful nation that cannot be a modern nation and the only become a modern nation if it permits democracy and if it permits secularism, the quality and presents and until then if it is successful -- >> let me say three things. i want to follow on the admiral's comments about democracy, it is remarkable to many in the u.s. military that the united states has not ratified the convention. we had a pretty sincere effort to bring it forward to the senate. we were a couple votes short. i think senator mikulski for her encouragement. i hope we will be able to take that up again and get it done as a country. it is challenging to make the case we are making which is these potential conflicts over territory from reed bank and
is suspected of having the third largest stockpile of chemical weapons after the united states and russia. the situation is just one topic being discussed by world leaders and a meeting of the foreign ministers, 40,000 men and women and children have recorded killed in syria during uprising. now, live from washington. are the united states officials commenting that the government has used the chemical weapons? >>reporter: reporters were told they do not have evidence of this but video uploaded by the syrian opposition and impossible to independently verify by fox, claims to show the use of the chemical weapons by assad regime. this fire which allegedly produces toxic smoke began after a tank was unloaded by a syrian jet over rebel-held territory. another video could not be authenticated showed gear confiscate by the opposition. the israeli around to the united states responded that the israelis have intelligence assets monitoring the stockpiles. >> syria has a very varied deep chemical weapons program. it is dispersed geographically. if the weapons were pass into the hands of hezbollah th
francisco today. we bought naval forces from the united states, from russia and japan all to honolulu
a tiny fraction of this to deal with china or russia t our nuclear arsenal isn't stopping iran from trying to achieve its nuclear weapon. these are sad, missed opportunities to right size the military which will still be the most powerful in the world by far. for us to deal with veterans' needs. mr. mcgovern: additional one minute. the speaker pro tempore: the gentleman is recognized. mr. blumenauer: for us to deal with the threats that we face today, to deal with the damage that we have done in the misguided war in iraq. to be able to deal meaningfully with the guard and ready reserve that should be upgraded and healed from the damage that was inflicted upon him. we can provide far more real security, save tax dollars, deal with the needs of veterans that are about to be, sadly, undercut , and provide balance to our budget. because, in fact, the fiscal instability for reckless -- from reckless bills like that is in fact a national security threat. we are no longer going to be able to pay almost half the world's entire military budget. we should start by rejecting this authorization
are right now and have a long, extended war? >> and if we are waiting on russia to come around and pave the way, similar to that in the case of libya, do you think that will pay off? >> i don't think so. it's hard to imagine russia at this point anyway, from my vantage point, maybe i'll be proved wrn ed wrong, approving u.n. resolution. even in the latest talks that hillary clinton has had, it's not like it's suddenly kumbaya and everybody's on the same page. they're not. obviously the russians are la looking at this very closely because they can tell that their client, assad, is in a very tricky situation. but by the very same token, the u.s. without being involved now really has not many friends on the ground in syria. so what happens if assad somehow falls? who do you then talk to? who do you then have relations with on the ground? i know they've come up with a coalition, this opposition coalition. but that too has yet to fully prove itself as an effective and consolidated opposition to bashar assad. and not just that, a coalition that can encourage his core group of supporters to de
of this space launch vehicle, bill. bill: what about international reaction, whether it's china, russia, south korea or japan, how are they react. >> reporter: negative reaction, bill remains very strong, like a whole region around north korea is on high alert. they claim it is for peaceful purposes, they send up a satellite, what the fear is that they are trying to test a long-range rocket that can carry a nuclear payload, they do have nuclear material. could be well in range of los angeles to be honest with you. tokyo right now being defended by a battery of patriot missiles, other place necessary japan being protected that way. japanese and south korea destroyers set to be deployed as well as four navy vessels from the u.s. an admiral saying this is a dangerous launch. there had been speculation that all of this negative reaction, yes, even coming from russia and china alwhraoeus to nort, allies to north korea may be playing a factor in this delay. i'm told no, kim jong un is the new young leader there. he's marking the first anniversary of the death of his father kim jong-il. we think acco
in maryland. we're gonna tell you why. >>> heart break for families trying to adopt from russia. we'll have more on the ban signed by president putin. >>> first here's a look at last night's winning lottery numbers. >> it's like taking candy from a baby, only this candy could cost that baby his or her identity. child identity theft is unfortunately not uncommon in the state of maryland. cable accounts could be opened in your child's name. now we have a law to try and stop that from happening. the first state in the nation to do it. sara sam son has more. >> a recent study finds one in ten children have had their social security numbers compromised in some way. according to the maryland attorney general's office, that's the low estimate. that's because some victims don't know they are victims. >> a child won't find out until they get to be an age where they have to apply for credit. >> a new law going into effect january 1st aims to keep kid's identity safe. the legislation is the first of its kind in the country. >> we want to make sure that children and other protective persons have an opp
that has any sway whatsoever is russia. seems to me president obama needs to be on the phone and make certain the russians are taking the right. >> apparently hillary clinton is talking. >> that's the only route that is going to stop this from happening. if left to his own devices, he will use those. >> and what about the countries that boarder. turkey. this stuff doesn't just stop. it gets into the atmosphere. you can't bomb the place. you have to send in ground troops. and now what happens ? the best thing that could happen is puten makes a phone call and says cut this stuff out. the middle east has gotten to be a very serious problem for everybody. >> maybe we will focus more on that next time around. the fiscal cliff keeps going and going. thank you both for coming in. good to talk to you again. allison, back to you. >> tony, thank you. still ahead at 7:00 , the sense of a woman now available in deep dish. as we go to break, holiday greetings from our service members overseas. >> good morning. this is williams your daughter. this message is for you. i wish you guys a happy holiday
that in a moment. >>> first, new signs that defeat could be near for al assad's regime. today russia, syria's most powerful ally, said assad's losing control of his country and admitted the opposition could win. nato's leader went further, saying the regime is approaching collapse. their comments came as opposition groups seized a military base near damascus. meantime, syrian state television said at least two dozen civilians were killed in two car bombings outside of damascus. seven children were said to be among those killed in this blast. in a nearby town, eight people, mostly women and children, were reported killed in this bombing according to state television. tonight, assad shows no outward signs of backing down, however, and in hotspots like aleppo, civilians are still dying in the cross fire. now that act of incredible courage that was caught on tape. here is arwa damon's exclusive report. >> reporter: a fighter slithers across the street, his body covered. yards away a woman lies motionless. she's been shot by a sniper. her rescuer is not a relative, nor a neighbor. he's never met her. a
with russia's foreign minister and syria's u.n. peace envoy to try to negotiate a peace strategy. they reportedly met for about 40 minutes in dublin to talk about how the start of political transition. this comes after defense secretary leon panetta warned syrian president may be considering using chemical weapons. yesterday reports surfaced that syria is loading chemical weapons into bombs. >>> a longtime face of the conservative movement and a tea party favorite is stepping down from congress. south carolina senator jim demint is stepping down. he's decided to do so at a time when the movement needs strong leadership. republican south carolina governor will select a replacement for that seat. she will not appoint herself. >>> police arrested a school aide of inappropriately touching three students. it happened at the maryland school for the deaf at columbia campus in howard county. 37-year-old clarence taylor is fising three counts of child sex abuse now. the girls say taylor touched them several times when he worked an evening shift as a dormitory aide between 2008 and 2010. t
control of syria? what does that many and how significant is that coming from russia? >> reporter: it's pretty enormous for those in damascus certainly. russia has been a political stalwart ally for political and diplomatic months over the past revolts 21 months long now. the point man of the middle east, deputy more than minister, saying he thinks unfortunately rebel victory is in fact possible.than minister, saying he thinks unfortunately rebel victory is in fact possible. suggesting we're seeing the trend moving in rebel direction. that's a big deal because in the past ten days to a week, we've seen the russians reassess that position, get involved with the meetings with the u.s., have lower level politicians saying the government isn't up to its job and putin be very friendly with turkish leaders, trying to make sure that relationship hasn't been permanently damaged. and now today we're seeing the first clear time that russia thinks assad is over. his days are perhaps numbered. and that will have huge ramifications on those inside the syrian regime worried themselves, seeing thems
peacefully or a bad let's talk about iran. let's talk about russia and let's talk about egypt which one is the king pin in this whole mess? >> rush sharks -- russia, period for syria anyway. base where they have ships coming into. they vin influence over both countries as we know the russians have been helping the iranians. egypt not so much. egypt has its own problems. iranians we are already in their face so to speak. sanctions. issues with elm this. russia is the king pin here. they can do the most good and the most harm. frankly, now if the represents are used they will hold partial responsibility since they supplied them to president assad and obviously they would be a coconspirator using bad act. >> we have to be concerned quick answer "yes" or "no" about assad sending those weapons of mass destruction over to iran, right? >> the biggest thing we have to worry about is him losing control of those weapons. terrorists or iran. terrorists worried about. but no matter what, we have got to maintain positivelike on where those things are at. >> lt. colonel tony shaffer, thank you, sir.
's talk that russia has them and assad might use them. do you believe any of that? do we really know when you think back to iraq, do we really know what chemical weapons syria has and whether assad would use them or if they could come into the hands of the al qaeda-linked groups or rebels could use them? >> my guess is they do have some. historically, this has always been the view. who knows how many and how effective they are. the most important thing to remember about chemical weapons is they're not actually that effective. so part of what -- the reason regimes like assad and saddam hussein stockpile them is because it scared people. it made them think, you know, we can poison whole villages. the truth is the gas disperses very fast. it's not very effective. so i would guess my gut is the syrian regime will not use it. i think that president obama's very stern warning to them probably helped in that rauegar. while we should be cautious, it's not clear they're going to use them. >> senator john mccain is trying to get on the senate foreign relations committee. which would put him in the
, north korea, china, russia and so forth. i would imagine it's a considerably lower. >> did the policy wax and wane with new administration's? >> it did. the most was during the kennedy years. jack kennedy as i said was determined to do something that the cuba problem. he was obsessed, humiliated that the day. lyndon johnson can after kennedy and his obsession with vietnam so he declined precipitously. subsequent presidents such as gerald ford, jimmy carter made a very serious efforts to achieve a rapprochement with castro, quite the opposite of what kennedy was doing. so yes, cuba has waxed and waned and it's been a different kind of priority over these 50 years, so it is with american presidents. estimate on the reverse side, does cuba have good assets, did they have good assets in the u.s.? has the castro regime ever tried to assassinate a u.s
.s. families when it takes effect january 1. russia is the third most popular country for americans to adopt behind china and ethiopia. >>> former president george h.w. bush remains in the intensive care unit of a houston hospital today. in a statement his longtime chief of staff urged the to put the harps back in the closet. the former president is 88 years old and has been in the hospital since november 23 for a bad case of bronchitis. he has since suffered a series of complications. >>> the national weather service has issued a new winter storm warning for the eastern half of the country as a new system threatens to cause even more travel headaches throughout the region. this comes after more than 21 inches of snow and rain already fell in the northeast. record snowfall in arkansas has left nearly 200,000 people without power. joining me now is the weather channel's kelly cass. kelly, i'm here in washington, d.c. we are hearing warnings from d.c. to maine. don't drive on saturday. you know, hunker down. what's going to hit the east coast over the weekend? >> it will get messy, that's for
happens. also this morning russia saying they will join the united states for a brainstorming meeting to try to end the bloodshed in syria. nato is going forward with a plan to move troops to the border. but bashar al assad continues to deny pressure. reports say they are preparing chemical weapons components that might be used against rebel forces inside syria. chad sweet is the former director of operations with the cia, the former chief of staff with the department of homeland security. it's nice to have you with us. i should appreciate it. so the signs that i have just mentioned and kind of listed there are very ominous. not just for folks here in the united states who worry about the role of the united states, but also for people in the region and outside the region too. does this mean that we have operatives who are filling us in on what's happening with the chemical weapons components and the degree to which they are being put on to these war heads? >> it's highly likely that the combination of sources have provided this intelligence. some of it is coming from human intelligenc
. though russia has perpetrated one of the most disgraceful deceits in the history of international relations the united states will continue to respect the charter of the united nations and its fleet will honor the ordinary rules of decency but let this be known, the u.s. blockade against defensive arms shipments to cuba will continue until the russians abandon their nefarious build-up of missile sites on the island. megyn: the cuban missile crisis may have been the high point of america's struggle with russia to be the world's dominant superpower. and the united states has come to own the title pretty much by itself in the recent years. but a new report shows that dominance may be in danger and the u.s. could lose its status as the world's only superpower. am boos door john bolton, former united nations ambassador. i don't know that we. the new report from the national intelligence council, from within the office of national intelligence, james clapper, said the u.s. will not longer be the only world superpower in the next 18 years by 2030, why not? >> let me say this the exercise
as russia has failed at newed a modernized, nukeler deterrents is a need of future modernization and yet this administration, resources -- has cut resources to begin planning for the upgrading and modernization of icbm's and nuclear-based systems that have largely been ignored. this trend simply cannot continue. but having recognized those problems that are there, it is also time to realize what this bill actually does that moves us as a nation forward. it will provide $552 billion, which is $2 billion more than the president requested, and that is a plus. it increases the pay for our all-voluntary forces by 1.7% and provides critical bonuses for those who are now working in harm's way. it keeps us safe with a military retirees and our veterans in regard to tricare and it rejects the administration's proposal to increase fees and co-pays -- co-payments on them. it deals with the issue of troop reduction in a responsible way by putting caps on the number of troop reductions that can be placed in a single year. it has a conscience clause for servicemen and chaplains. it implements the hyde
will be china. europe, russia, china, continue to decline. and india will grow like china today. in a tectonic shift, asia will have surpassed north america in europe in terms of global power, based upon gdp, population size, military spending and tech technological investment. china will surpass the u.s. economy even before that what does this mean? look when you see the short-termism in washington, where they are arguing about tax increases and entitlement reform and very short-term thinking overall, this is the big picture. the big picture is more change any time since the french revolution, the industrial revolution in the 18th century and happening more quickly than we have ever seen. people more empowered. governments having less power and no single global leader. quickly about global leaders in business. a new report released a catalyst for us. and growth for pay and positions for women at the highest levels of corporate america, flat lining. flat lining of the fortune 500, 14% are women, 85% men. this is not moving. 8.1% of top earners in corporate america are women. 91% are men. board
that you ran linage of windows and 18 and was drawn by the threats to separate british, india from russia and to this day many of the afghans don't recognize it because their families live in pakistan. they want freedom of movement, freedom of the ability to go and diverse that steep terrain, if you complete but it's also historically illicit trade. right across the mountains. some of it, ma it is what it is but some of it is forced upon insurgencies as well. i mentioned a complex nature of being at work the whole time. but you also got a population that is about 72 -- 10%. a passenger for the people in this very remote subsistence farming-based province is illiterate. their neighbors to the war in -- to the north were only conquered through force and converted to islam and renamed the children of the life. so you're talking a whole region that is geographically very, very complex. mountain peaks 14,000 feet. the basis are down on the river valley about 1500 feet. so just a vertical geography to try to do anything on the ground as a soldier, as a citizen is an extremely difficult challeng
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